Lassie Come Home

Lassie is Joe’s prize collie and constant companion. But when Joe’s father loses his job, Lassie must be sold. Three times she escapes from her new owner, and three times she returns home to Joe, until finally she is taken to the remotest part of Scotland—too far a journey for any dog to make alone.

But Lassie is not just any dog.

First published in 1940, Lassie Come-Home has become one of the best-loved dog stories in the world. This beautiful edition showcases the original text and illustrations within a striking new jacket.

Eric Knight at home with his dog, Tootsie.    The story of Lassie was based on Tootsie.

When is the last time you read this book, if ever?  It doesn’t matter how many times you have seen the movie – don’t miss the opportunity to enjoy Eric Knight’s classic, Lassie Come Home in print.

From BookRags:

1. Why are Lassie and the Carraclough family so devoted to each other? How do each of those characters benefit from the other characters’ love? In what ways do they treat each other the same, and how do they treat each other differently? How does Lassie connect the three Carracloughs as a family?

2. Compare and contrast the Duke of Rudling, his granddaughter Priscilla, and the kennel man Hynes with the Carracloughs. Do you think Knight selected those characters’ names to suggest socioeconomic and personality traits such as rudeness? What do these characterizations reveal about class in Great Britain?

3. Discuss the Carracloughs’ strategies to persevere despite lean and discouraging times. How do their efforts parallel Lassie’s journey?

4. How do the dog characters resemble human characters? Does Knight describe animals and humans with any physical attributes which are clues to their inherent goodness or unsavoriness?

Make treats for your pets:

Peanut Butter Puppy Poppers (Treat for your Dog!)
2 cups whole-wheat flour
1 tbsp. baking powder
1 cup peanut butter (chunky or smooth)
1 cup milk

Preheat oven to 375’F. In a bowl, combine flour and baking powder. In another bowl, mix peanut butter and milk, then add to dry ingredients and mix well. Place dough on a lightly floured surface and knead. Roll dough to 1/4 inch thickness and use a cookie cutter to cut out shapes.

Bake for 15-20 minutes on a greased baking sheet until lightly brown. The cookies burn easily, so watch carefully.  Cool on a rack, then store in an airtight container.

My Heart is Like a Zoo Craft

All you need is some colored paper, glue, scissors, and wriggly eyes!

What a fun activity for children – anytime!  This activity is based on our book review of My Heart is Like a Zoo.

First we went to the Dollar Store and found this set of six heart shapes – yep, for just a $1.

We used the shapes to trace several different sized hearts on various colored sheets of card stock purchased from our local Michael’s.
I was excited to be able to cut out various shades of some colors – because I’d rather give children three shades of yellow to work with, instead of just “yellow”.   But that’s just me.  (and why I love the Pantone Colors book for children – see REVIEW here.
After reading our CLIP pick book for February, My Heart is Like a Zoo, give your child the palette of heart shapes & colors, some wiggly eyes and let them create.
Mount on a sheet of black or white card stock and display for all to see!
A few more details and our creation will be complete.  Cute!

Encourage original animal creations, or allow children to replicate an animal from the book. It doesn’t matter as long as you are having fun creating together!

Oh, and check out this cute idea!

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CLICK HERE for pattern.
From Mrs. T’s First Grade Class

Enjoy!

Deni Corbett

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Daddy’s Ice Rink

 

Imagine my joy when I first saw the book Testing the Ice.  I could hardly wait to read it. Here’s a dad surrounded by a bunch of kids excitedly running to ice skate.  So many memories came flooding back as I read this amazing account of Jackie Robinson’s life.  In his tender caring for his children and their friends, I recalled my own dad wiping away many tears as we kids would fall while ice skating or get so cold our toes felt frozen.

Funny how all this reminiscing about ice has made me feel all warm inside.  Good memories do that.

I can’t wait to read Testing the Ice with my grandchildren and then share my own heritage moment. Perhaps you have a winter story that you can share. Maybe you made a snowman, went sledding, or built a snow fort.  Tell your story (write it down) – I guarantee you’ll be glad you went to the effort of moving from Heritage 2 Legacy (more information).

Daddy’s Ice Rink

When I was a little girl, freezing cold winter days meant only one thing – FUN!  Bundled up in pants, sweaters, jackets, scarves, mittens, and hats, we headed outdoors with one purpose.  Ice skating.  My dad was right out there with us in his winter cap that we all thought looked so silly.  Well, this is a story about that hat.  Hanging in our family room are two precious memories: my dad’s winter cap with fold-down ear flaps and my childhood ice skates.  Since our dad played hockey for the University of North Dakota, learning to ice skate came as natural to me and my sisters as walking.

Every winter your great-grandfather flooded our back yard and created a magnificent neighborhood ice rink.  It was glorious!  After a snowfall, he’d shovel the snow along the side to create a nice bank for us to slide into.  We would play fox and geese, race, practice figure eights,  and even master skating backwards.  But I never could skate as fast as my dad.  He skillfully turned and zipped around while the ear flaps on his cap just bounced.  He taught us and all the neighborhood kids how to skate.

How I wish he was here to teach you to skate . . .but you all can have fun wearing his cap!

Love, Button

 

 

Poem: Stopping by Woods…

[Verbal Communications]
Don’t miss the audio at the end!

Children are quite capable of memorizing this poem by Robert Frost, but it is also a wonderful poem to simply read over and over again to a younger child.   Poetry is so important for language development because of the “music” of the words as well as the rhythm and rhyme of the word combinations used in the poem.   This poem is a prime example.    Read this poem often to a younger child and allow them to add the last rhyming word to select lines themselves. I encourage you to print out a copy of this poem and enjoy it together with your child(ren).

NOTE: We will be highlighting this poem in our “S is for SNOW” script coming soon.

Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer;
To stop without a farmhouse near.
Between the woods and frozen lake,
The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake
The only other sound’s the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep.

by Robert Frost

This is a great Study Guide if you are interested in digging deeper into this poem.

The following is are readings of Robert Frost’s poem by 7-year-old Chasing Fireflies friends:

Emma

Our favorite illustrated version of this book?  The one illustrated by Susan Jeffers.
See past review HERE.
There’s even a link to the illustrator’s artist page where she will walk you through how to draw a horse!