A Fine Dessert

Love this story – love the illustrations… don’t ask me which I love more.   The simple storyline, based on the oldest dessert in western culture (over 300 years old) combined with the detailed illustrations by Sophie Blackall, create a rich backdrop on which to have inspired conversations with children as together you snuggle, share, and learn.    Oh – and did you know that the illustrator actually used blackberry goop – to paint the endpapers of the book?  Fun trivia!
This author also illustrated one of my all-time favorite book finds – Finding Winnie.  Sigh…it’s wonderful.  OK – I probably will have to devote a shelf to Sophia Blackall books now.

Begin by watching this video – an KidLit visit with the author and illustrator as they demonstrate how to make the actual recipe using the various authentic kitchen tools (a whisk).

You say spatuler… I say spatula. (Watch the video.)

If you are following us on Heritage2Legacy.com, and have chosen a treasured family recipe to share with loved ones, consider the different kitchen tools your ancestors used when creating the original version of your recipe.   What did great-grandma use before there was a KichenAid on the counter?

Deni Corbett

LINK: Emily Jenkins and Sophie Blackall Create A FINE DESSERT!

From Penguin Random House:
A Fine Dessert: Four Centuries, Four Families, One Delicious Treat
In this fascinating picture book, four families, in four different cities, over four centuries, make the same delicious dessert: blackberry fool. This richly detailed book ingeniously shows how food, technology, and even families have changed throughout American history.

In 1710, a girl and her mother in Lyme, England, prepare a blackberry fool, picking wild blackberries and beating cream from their cow with a bundle of twigs. The same dessert is prepared by a slave girl and her mother in 1810 in Charleston, South Carolina; by a mother and daughter in 1910 in Boston; and finally by a boy and his father in present-day San Diego.

Kids and parents alike will delight in discovering the differences in daily life over the course of four centuries. Includes a recipe for blackberry fool and notes from the author and illustrator about their research.

Pumpkin Soup

This is a sweet book about a family, a friendship and a favorite soup – not too salty…just right!  With a recipe in the back of the book, Pumpkin Soup by Helen Cooper fits perfectly into this month’s theme.   Read and enjoy with your child(ren) and then make some soup, while sharing together about what makes a good friend.

(resources at the end of this post)

If you are following us on Heritage2Legacy.com, you might consider using this book if your family recipe is a soup favorite!

By the Kate Greenaway Medalist, Helen Cooper

Deep in the woods in an old white cabin, three friends make their pumpkin soup the same way every day. The Cat slices up the pumpkin, the Squirrel stirs in the water, and the Duck tips in just enough salt. But one day the Duck wants to stir instead, and then there is a horrible squabble, and he leaves the cabin in a huff. It isn’t long before the Cat and the Squirrel start to worry about him and begin a search for their friend. Rendered in pictures richly evoking autumn, Helen Cooper’s delightful story will resonate for any child who has known the difficulties that come with friendship. Included at the end is a recipe for delicious pumpkin soup.                        Amazon Review

Teaching resource for this sweet book.

Sensory activities for this book.

Pumpkin Soup Recipe inspired by the book

Our October Booklist

Our theme for this month is

Fall Leaves

Here is a booklist to take to your local library.  It’s full of our favorite books including my latest find – and what a find it is.  Fall Walk by Virginia Brimhall Snow.  Please find this book and experience the beauty of the illustrations as you enjoy a walk through the woods.   All of our activities on TheFirefliesClassroom.com will be based on this book.   Join us!

CLICK HERE

Favorite Books & Enchanted Attics

Favorite Childhood Books and Enchanted Attics

By Gil Moegerle

September 26, 2017

Why, when we were children, were attics magical? Why did they trigger our imaginations the moment we stepped through those creaking doors or, better yet, as we pulled down that hidden ceiling door, climbed that folding ladder and our eyes pop up above those rafters? Surely, we thought, mysterious and glorious adventures awaited. We were certain inside that dusty trunk over there were amazing artifacts from olden days. And what about this old wardrobe mom and dad hauled up here when they got a new one? Surely treasures grander than any pirate’s resided behind those old doors.

The stairs leading to my enchanted attic…

Granddad Moegerle, Pop Pop we called him, had an attic. We walked up wooden stairs in the living room to reach it. To the left was a partially finished guest bedroom where we slept during sleepovers. Straight ahead was a bath. Then there was that door to the right that called to me. Behind it, a stand-up, unfinished storage attic. I remember asking once if I could sleep in there instead of the guest bedroom. Why? Mystery. Adventure.

That’s why, many years later, I partially finished the attic of my condo, then built a model railroad layout the entire length of the place. Because I knew that saying to my grandchildren, “Want to go up in the attic?” is about as magical as a grandpa gets…

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