Archives for November 10, 2017

A Fine Dessert

Love this story – love the illustrations… don’t ask me which I love more.   The simple storyline, based on the oldest dessert in western culture (over 300 years old) combined with the detailed illustrations by Sophie Blackall, create a rich backdrop on which to have inspired conversations with children as together you snuggle, share, and learn.    Oh – and did you know that the illustrator actually used blackberry goop – to paint the endpapers of the book?  Fun trivia!
This author also illustrated one of my all-time favorite book finds – Finding Winnie.  Sigh…it’s wonderful.  OK – I probably will have to devote a shelf to Sophia Blackall books now.

Begin by watching this video – an KidLit visit with the author and illustrator as they demonstrate how to make the actual recipe using the various authentic kitchen tools (a whisk).

You say spatuler… I say spatula. (Watch the video.)

If you are following us on Heritage2Legacy.com, and have chosen a treasured family recipe to share with loved ones, consider the different kitchen tools your ancestors used when creating the original version of your recipe.   What did great-grandma use before there was a KichenAid on the counter?

Deni Corbett

LINK: Emily Jenkins and Sophie Blackall Create A FINE DESSERT!

From Penguin Random House:
A Fine Dessert: Four Centuries, Four Families, One Delicious Treat
In this fascinating picture book, four families, in four different cities, over four centuries, make the same delicious dessert: blackberry fool. This richly detailed book ingeniously shows how food, technology, and even families have changed throughout American history.

In 1710, a girl and her mother in Lyme, England, prepare a blackberry fool, picking wild blackberries and beating cream from their cow with a bundle of twigs. The same dessert is prepared by a slave girl and her mother in 1810 in Charleston, South Carolina; by a mother and daughter in 1910 in Boston; and finally by a boy and his father in present-day San Diego.

Kids and parents alike will delight in discovering the differences in daily life over the course of four centuries. Includes a recipe for blackberry fool and notes from the author and illustrator about their research.