Archives for November 2017

Christmas Cookies

Christmas Cookies:  Bite-Size Holiday Lessons by Amy Krouse Rosenthal is the perfect seasonal book offering a fresh batch of words that encompasses everything you might say to a child.  Cookie-centric definitions range from “offering the very first cookie to your grandmother” (respect),  to “you asked me to put away the cookie cutters, and you can count on me to do it” (responsible).

I especially like those two definitions with all the cookie baking I do with my grandchildren during the holidays. Sugar cookies are their favorites and my kitchen counters are an array of children on tiptoe and chairs with flour everywhere, sprinkles of every color in abundance,  and of course, frosting! oh goodness! I’m not sure if there’s more frosting on the cookies or on little noses, but the laughter and squeals of hilarity as snowmen, angels, bells, and and snowflakes get decorated. We will never win a decorating contest, but I tell my flour speckled, frosting smeared grandchildren, “that there is nowhere in the universe I’d rather be than here in my kitchen, baking sugar cookies with you,” (cherish).

If you are joining us on our H2L adventure, and have a favorite cookie recipe that has been handed down to you through the years, consider writing it out along with the story that goes along with it, attach it to the back of this book, wrap it up and present it to a young loved one.

Heritage 2 Legacy:  Taking your family heritage and pushing it forward into legacy.

Pre-school – 3rd grade . This charming picture book offers a glossary of terms defined in child-friendly ways and related to the theme of Christmas cookies: “FRUSTRATED means, I can’t believe we burned them again / PERSEVERANCE means, We tried and tried and tried, and finally we made the perfect non-burned batch,” and “HOPE means, I’m filled with good feelings about what will be.” Rather than following one child throughout the book, the delightful ink-and-watercolor illustrations depict a variety of children and dressed animals with a bit of carryover of characters from one picture to the next. A sugar-cookie recipe is appended to this wholesome Christmas offering.   Booklist

Stone Soup

Author/Illustrator: Marcia Brown

12,487 Ideas on PINTEREST to use with Stone Soup (slight exaggeration…)

This delightful story provided me with a fun teaching opportunity with my first graders every year.  While learning the difference between fiction and non-fiction books, I read them Stone Soup.  They agreed that surely no one would put stones in their soup, so of course it was fiction.  I proceeded to pull a (much-scrubbed) large stone from my reading apron pocket, put it in a crockpot, and add the ingredients from the following recipe.  I’m sure you could have heard a pin drop, as those little children’s eyes looked at me with both amazement and even a bit of shock.  Some child always ventured to ask, “Are we really going to eat that?”  I just smiled. . .   We went on with our day and several hours later the aroma began to fill the classroom and several more children asked about tasting our “soup.”  I just smiled…  Finally, I opened the lid and ladled out a helping for each child.  Yes, the rock stayed in the crockpot!  Our stone soup was a huge success, and it was unanimously decided that perhaps a story might be fiction and non-fiction at the same time!

Potato-Beef Soup (adding a stone is optional!)

2 lb ground beef  (cooked and drained)           4 cups water

4 cups  (cubed and peeled)                                 2 tsp salt

1 onion , chopped                                                  2 tsp pepper

3 cans (8 oz) tomato sauce                                 1 tsp hot pepper sauce

Put ingredients in crockpot on high for 3-4 hours or low for 5-6 hours.  (Remove stone before enjoying!)

 

From the Publisher

This old French tale about soldiers who trick miserly villages into making them a feast won a Caldecott Medal when Brown retold and illustrated it in 1947.

Three soldiers came marching down the road towards a French village. The peasants seeing them coming, suddenly became very busy, for soldiers are often hungry. So all the food was hidden under mattresses or in barns. There followed a battle of wits, with the soldiers equal to the occasion. Stone soup? Why, of course, they could make a wonderful soup of stones…but, of course, one must add a carrot or two…some meat…so it went. Marcia Brown has made of this old tale a very cheerful book, a carnival of activity, of dancing and laughter. So much goes on in the pictures that children who have once heard the story will turn to them again and again, retelling the story for themselves.

 

Because of Thursday

Thursdays have always been lucky for Annie Fetlock. She was born on a Thursday. She won her first cooking contest at the age of eight on a Thursday. She met the love of her life, Mario, on a Thursday. They were married on a bright Thursday afternoon and their two children were both born on a Thursday. Annie is known far and wide for her Poke Pasta Salad and has the most popular restaurant for miles around.

When Mario suddenly passes away, Annie’s joy and love of cooking disappears. Before too long, a little kitty appears and Annie takes the kitty in, and, of course, calls it Thursday. Annie is back making Poke Salad in no time. Thursday the cat is known for amazing twirls and tricks and one day his twirls land him in Annie’s draining rigatoni, causing the pot of hot oil, garlic, and peppers to spill into the pasta! Then the entire container of Parmesan cheese overturned into the mix. The customers were horrified until they noticed that what looked like a big mess had the most amazing aroma and turned out to be the most delicious pasta dish ever created! Ugly Pasta—the dish that would make Annie famous for miles around—was born. And of course it was a Thursday! 

A Fine Dessert

Love this story – love the illustrations… don’t ask me which I love more.   The simple storyline, based on the oldest dessert in western culture (over 300 years old) combined with the detailed illustrations by Sophie Blackall, create a rich backdrop on which to have inspired conversations with children as together you snuggle, share, and learn.    Oh – and did you know that the illustrator actually used blackberry goop – to paint the endpapers of the book?  Fun trivia!
This author also illustrated one of my all-time favorite book finds – Finding Winnie.  Sigh…it’s wonderful.  OK – I probably will have to devote a shelf to Sophia Blackall books now.

Begin by watching this video – an KidLit visit with the author and illustrator as they demonstrate how to make the actual recipe using the various authentic kitchen tools (a whisk).

You say spatuler… I say spatula. (Watch the video.)

If you are following us on Heritage2Legacy.com, and have chosen a treasured family recipe to share with loved ones, consider the different kitchen tools your ancestors used when creating the original version of your recipe.   What did great-grandma use before there was a KichenAid on the counter?

Deni Corbett

LINK: Emily Jenkins and Sophie Blackall Create A FINE DESSERT!

From Penguin Random House:
A Fine Dessert: Four Centuries, Four Families, One Delicious Treat
In this fascinating picture book, four families, in four different cities, over four centuries, make the same delicious dessert: blackberry fool. This richly detailed book ingeniously shows how food, technology, and even families have changed throughout American history.

In 1710, a girl and her mother in Lyme, England, prepare a blackberry fool, picking wild blackberries and beating cream from their cow with a bundle of twigs. The same dessert is prepared by a slave girl and her mother in 1810 in Charleston, South Carolina; by a mother and daughter in 1910 in Boston; and finally by a boy and his father in present-day San Diego.

Kids and parents alike will delight in discovering the differences in daily life over the course of four centuries. Includes a recipe for blackberry fool and notes from the author and illustrator about their research.